Getting Started

Starting Remodulin IV therapy

Remodulin IV is delivered directly into the bloodstream through a narrow, flexible tube called a catheter. To start therapy, you will be admitted to the hospital, where a doctor will place the catheter in a vein in your upper chest area. The procedure generally takes an hour and a half and requires an overnight stay in the hospital. Once in place, the catheter attaches to a pump that delivers your medication continuously. Talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of intravenous infusion.

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Stability was demonstrated as low as 0.004 mg/mL.
Remodulin cannot be stored for 14 days when mixed with Sterile Water for Injection or Sodium Chloride Injection. The CADD-MS® 3 pump should not be used with premixed Remodulin. Contact your healthcare provider or Specialty Pharmacy to confirm that you are using a sterile high-pH glycine diluent or to discuss switching to one.
The amount of premixed Remodulin you receive will be dependent on the Specialty Pharmacy. Program participation is based on doctor's recommendation. Individuals must be on a consistent dose of Remodulin IV and have been self-mixing for at least 3 months.

Introduction to Remodulin Intravenous (IV)

(7:28 min)

Selected Important Safety Information

What are the serious side effects of Remodulin?

Learn about premixing for Remodulin IV

Remodulin® (treprostinil) Injection

What is Remodulin?

Remodulin is a prescription medication used to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; WHO Group 1), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Remodulin can reduce symptoms associated with exercise. Remodulin was studied mainly in patients with NYHA Functional Class II-IV symptoms. It is not known if Remodulin is safe and effective in children.

In people with PAH who need to switch from epoprostenol, Remodulin is approved to slow the worsening of symptoms.

Important Safety Information for Remodulin

Before you take Remodulin, tell your healthcare provider if you:

What are the serious side effects of Remodulin?

What are the possible side effects of Remodulin?

You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

REMISIdtcJUL18

Please see accompanying Full Prescribing Information for Remodulin.

For additional information, visit http://www.remodulin.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

This information is provided for an informational purpose and is not intended as treatment advice. Patients should consult a healthcare professional for treatment advice.

Important Safety Information and Indication

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Remodulin® (treprostinil) Injection

What is Remodulin?

Remodulin is a prescription medication used to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; WHO Group 1), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Remodulin can reduce symptoms associated with exercise. Remodulin was studied mainly in patients with NYHA Functional Class II-IV symptoms. It is not known if Remodulin is safe and effective in children.

In people with PAH who need to switch from epoprostenol, Remodulin is approved to slow the worsening of symptoms.

Important Safety Information for Remodulin

Before you take Remodulin, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have other medical conditions or take other medicines that may affect your use of Remodulin by increasing the risk of side effects or decreasing the drug’s effectiveness.
  • Have liver or kidney problems. Your Remodulin dose may need to be adjusted if you have liver problems.
  • Have low blood pressure or bleeding problems.
  • Are taking gemfibrozil (for high cholesterol), rifampin (for infection) or other drugs that affect liver enzymes. Your doctor may need to adjust your Remodulin dosage.
  • Are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Remodulin will harm your unborn baby or if Remodulin passes into your breast milk.

What are the serious side effects of Remodulin?

  • Continuous intravenous (IV) infusions of Remodulin delivered using an external infusion pump, with a tube placed in a central vein within the chest, are associated with the risk of blood stream infections and sepsis, which may be fatal. Therefore, continuous subcutaneous (SC) infusion delivered just beneath the skin is the preferred type of delivery.
  • Worsening of PAH symptoms. Do not stop taking or greatly reduce your Remodulin dose without consulting your doctor.
  • Low blood pressure (symptomatic hypotension). If you have low blood pressure or are taking drugs that lower your blood pressure, the risk of low blood pressure is increased.
  • Bleeding problems. Remodulin may increase the risk of bleeding in people who take blood thinners (anticoagulants).

What are the possible side effects of Remodulin?

  • In clinical studies of SC infusion of Remodulin, most people experienced infusion site pain and infusion site reaction (redness, swelling, and rash). These symptoms were sometimes severe and sometimes required treatment with narcotics or discontinuation of Remodulin.
  • IV infusion of Remodulin delivered through an external pump has been associated with the risk of blood stream infections, arm swelling, tingling sensations, bruising, and pain.
  • The most common side effects seen with either SC or IV Remodulin were headache, diarrhea, nausea, rash, jaw pain, widening of the blood vessels (vasodilatation), and swelling from fluid retention (edema). These are not all the possible side effects of Remodulin. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

REMISIdtcJUL18

Please see accompanying Full Prescribing Information for Remodulin.

For additional information, visit http://www.remodulin.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

This information is provided for an informational purpose and is not intended as treatment advice. Patients should consult a healthcare professional for treatment advice.