Remodulin Videos

The following videos offer helpful information on treatment with Remodulin and living with pump therapy.

About Remodulin

Living With Remodulin

Learn about how pump therapy works and the benefits and risks of Remodulin treatment.

Introduction to Remodulin Subcutaneous (SC)

Hear from a nurse who works with people with PAH about the subcutaneous administration of Remodulin and what to expect from treatment.

How Blood Flows in the Vessels in the Lungs

See what happens to the flow of blood in your lungs with PAH.

Patient Perspectives

Adjusting to Your New Normal

Elena discusses her adjustment to life with an infusion pump and how she worked Remodulin into her daily routine.

Wearing Your Pump

Alberta didn’t let pump therapy stop her from living a normal life. Hear her tips on wearing and maintaining a pump as well as her experiences learning from the PAH community.

Life With PAH: Donna’s Story

Donna shares her experiences with PAH and treatment with Remodulin.

Patient Documentary

Hear from Errin and Donna about their experiences with treatment and learn tips from other patients on managing a pump.

Pump Options

Remunity Pump for Remodulin®

Find out more about a small, discreet subcutaneous pump that’s designed to simplify the delivery of Remodulin.

CADD-MS® 3 Ambulatory Infusion Pump

Learn about a traditional all-in-one pump for subcutaneous delivery of Remodulin.

CADD-Legacy® 1 PCA Ambulatory Infusion Pump

Learn about a proven pump for continuous IV delivery of Remodulin.

IV=intravenous.

PAH Life Hacks

PAH Life Hacks: Showering With Your Pump

PAH patient Carey shares her tips on how to protect a pump in the shower.

PAH Life Hacks: Traveling With Your Pump

PAH patient Wendy shares some advice for traveling with a pump.

Remodulin® (treprostinil) Injection

Important Safety Information for Remodulin

Before you take Remodulin, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have other medical conditions or take other medicines that may affect your use of Remodulin by increasing the risk of side effects or decreasing the drug’s effectiveness.
  • Have liver or kidney problems. Your Remodulin dose may need to be adjusted if you have liver problems.
  • Have low blood pressure or bleeding problems.
  • Are taking gemfibrozil (for high cholesterol), rifampin (for infection) or other drugs that affect liver enzymes. Your doctor may need to adjust your Remodulin dosage.
  • Are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Remodulin will harm your unborn baby or if Remodulin passes into your breast milk.

What are the serious side effects of Remodulin?

  • Continuous intravenous (IV) infusions of Remodulin delivered using an external infusion pump, with a tube placed in a central vein within the chest, are associated with the risk of blood stream infections and sepsis, which may be fatal. Therefore, continuous subcutaneous (SC) infusion delivered just beneath the skin is the preferred type of delivery.
  • Worsening of PAH symptoms. Do not stop taking or greatly reduce your Remodulin dose without consulting your doctor.
  • Low blood pressure (symptomatic hypotension). If you have low blood pressure or are taking drugs that lower your blood pressure, the risk of low blood pressure is increased.
  • Bleeding problems. Remodulin may increase the risk of bleeding in people who take blood thinners (anticoagulants).

What are the possible side effects of Remodulin?

  • In clinical studies of SC infusion of Remodulin, most people experienced infusion site pain and infusion site reaction (redness, swelling, and rash). These symptoms were sometimes severe and sometimes required treatment with narcotics or discontinuation of Remodulin.
  • IV infusion of Remodulin delivered through an external pump has been associated with the risk of blood stream infections, arm swelling, tingling sensations, bruising, and pain.
  • The most common side effects seen with either SC or IV Remodulin were headache, diarrhea, nausea, rash, jaw pain, widening of the blood vessels (vasodilatation), and swelling from fluid retention (edema). These are not all the possible side effects of Remodulin. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive.

What is Remodulin?

Remodulin is a prescription medication used to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; WHO Group 1), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Remodulin can reduce symptoms associated with exercise. Remodulin was studied mainly in patients with NYHA Functional Class II-IV symptoms. It is not known if Remodulin is safe and effective in children.

In people with PAH who need to switch from epoprostenol, Remodulin is approved to slow the worsening of symptoms.

REMISIconOct19

To learn more about Remodulin, talk with your healthcare provider. Please see Full Prescribing Information at www.remodulin.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

PAH=pulmonary arterial hypertension; WHO=World Health Organization.

Remodulin® (treprostinil) Injection

Important Safety Information for Remodulin

Before you take Remodulin, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have other medical conditions or take other medicines that may affect your use of Remodulin by increasing the risk of side effects or decreasing the drug’s effectiveness.
  • Have liver or kidney problems. Your Remodulin dose may need to be adjusted if you have liver problems.
  • Have low blood pressure or bleeding problems.
  • Are taking gemfibrozil (for high cholesterol), rifampin (for infection) or other drugs that affect liver enzymes. Your doctor may need to adjust your Remodulin dosage.
  • Are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Remodulin will harm your unborn baby or if Remodulin passes into your breast milk.

What are the serious side effects of Remodulin?

  • Continuous intravenous (IV) infusions of Remodulin delivered using an external infusion pump, with a tube placed in a central vein within the chest, are associated with the risk of blood stream infections and sepsis, which may be fatal. Therefore, continuous subcutaneous (SC) infusion delivered just beneath the skin is the preferred type of delivery.
  • Worsening of PAH symptoms. Do not stop taking or greatly reduce your Remodulin dose without consulting your doctor.
  • Low blood pressure (symptomatic hypotension). If you have low blood pressure or are taking drugs that lower your blood pressure, the risk of low blood pressure is increased.
  • Bleeding problems. Remodulin may increase the risk of bleeding in people who take blood thinners (anticoagulants).

What are the possible side effects of Remodulin?

  • In clinical studies of SC infusion of Remodulin, most people experienced infusion site pain and infusion site reaction (redness, swelling, and rash). These symptoms were sometimes severe and sometimes required treatment with narcotics or discontinuation of Remodulin.
  • IV infusion of Remodulin delivered through an external pump has been associated with the risk of blood stream infections, arm swelling, tingling sensations, bruising, and pain.
  • The most common side effects seen with either SC or IV Remodulin were headache, diarrhea, nausea, rash, jaw pain, widening of the blood vessels (vasodilatation), and swelling from fluid retention (edema). These are not all the possible side effects of Remodulin. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/MedWatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive.

What is Remodulin?

Remodulin is a prescription medication used to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; WHO Group 1), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs. Remodulin can reduce symptoms associated with exercise. Remodulin was studied mainly in patients with NYHA Functional Class II-IV symptoms. It is not known if Remodulin is safe and effective in children.

In people with PAH who need to switch from epoprostenol, Remodulin is approved to slow the worsening of symptoms.

REMISIconOct19

To learn more about Remodulin, talk with your healthcare provider. Please see Full Prescribing Information at www.remodulin.com or call Customer Service at 1-877-UNITHER (1-877-864-8437).

PAH=pulmonary arterial hypertension; WHO=World Health Organization.